Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

EDC 201 - Early Childhood Discipline: Growth and Development: Scholarly vs. Non-Scholarly Sources

Scholarly vs. Non-Scholarly Characteristics

CHECKLIST OF SCHOLARLY CHARACTERISTICS

Books

Scholarly

Non-Scholarly

Is the author / editor an expert in his/her field?

Yes

No

Is there a bibliography at end of chapters or the end of the book?

Yes

No

Does the book contain footnotes?

Yes

No

Does the overall tone/content appear scholarly?

Yes

No

Articles

Scholarly

Non-Scholarly

Is there an author?

Yes

No

Is there more than one author/editor?

Yes

No

Is the author / editor an expert in his/her field?

Yes

No

Is there a DOI (Digital Object Identifier)?

Yes

No

Are the articles long? (5 or more pages?)

Yes

No

Is the emphasis on text? (Few if any pictures)

Yes

No

Are there charts and graphs?

Yes

No

Is there a bibliography at the end?

Yes

No

Does it contain footnotes?     

Yes

No

Does the overall tone/content appear scholarly?

No

No

Web Sites

Websites are seldom “scholarly.” Instead the user often has to choose between a source of “reliable” and “unreliable” information.

Reliable

Unreliable

Is the person or organization responsible for the website identified?

Yes

No

Does the website cite its sources?

Yes

No

Is the person or organization responsible for the website an expert in the content presented on the site?

Yes

No

Does it cite reliable sources to support its argument?

Yes

No

Does it sound open minded and fair?            

Yes

No

Is the general appearance of the website (graphics/spelling) well maintained and of good quality?       

Yes

No

Does it avoid commercialism?

Yes

No

Evalute these resources - Scholarly vs. Non-Scholarly. Reliable vs. Unreliable.

Exceptions To The Rule

Few resources check all the Yes boxes or all the No boxes.

Many resources will exhibit a mixture of characteristics.

If unsure about an article or book, the most important characteristics of "scholarlyness," is the presence of a bibliography.

What is 'Peer-Reviewed?"

What is peer reviewed? Some publications have editorial boards consisting of experts in the field who review articles for reliablilty and scholarship.

Tips on Finding Scholarly Resources

1. Avoid the internet.

2. Use Thrift Library Resources.

3. Limit your results to Peer Reviewed. (See below)

4. Determine that your resource contains most of the characteristics listed on the checklist to your left.

Peer Review Limiter - Located on left side of OneSearch screen

You can limit your results to Peer-reviewed Journals in OneSearch with an easy click.

However...

  • This only only tells you your article was found in a scholarly journal. Scholarly journals sometimes contain both scholarly and non-scholarly content.
  • There is no limiter in OneSearch for books or eBooks

Google Scholar